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HMT Empire Windrush FL9448 cc wikicommonsThousands of men and women who arrived in the UK as children during the first wave of Commonwealth immigration now face being threatened with deportation.

The group, known as the Windrush generation – is named after the HMS Empire Windrush which, in 1948, brought workers from the West Indies to Britain.

Under the 1971 Immigration Act, all Commonwealth citizens already living in the UK (having arrived between 1948 and 1971) were given indefinite leave to remain but the Home Office did not keep a record of those granted leave to remain or issue any paperwork confirming it.

Read more: Government must put heart and soul into helping Windrush generation

Syria cc Freedom House Flicker bannerThe United Reformed Church is pressing the British government to avoid participating in any further military action in Syria and instead to urgently work with international partners to pursue peaceful solutions.

Early on the morning of Saturday 14 April 2018, the UK joined the US and France in bombing government sites in Syria, targeting chemical weapons facilities.

The move was in response to a chemical attack launched by forces loyal to Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad on 7 April where scores of innocent people were killed or injured.

Read more: United Reformed Church condemns military action in Syria

News banner Derek and JaneA special gathering was held on 11 April for staff from the United Reformed Church’s London office to meet all the residents of ‘The Nest’ – the top floor of Church House.

Greenbelt moved into The Nest in September, followed by The Trussell Trust’s external affairs department in January, and have since been joined by Street Child United, Single Friendly Church and the UK branch of International Justice Mission, described as the largest anti-slavery charity in the world.

Read more: Charity residents nest into Church House’s social impact hub

Mal Breeze group bAccording to White Fright: Divided Britain, a BBC Panorama programme aired in January 2018, Blackburn is a community segregated along ethnic and religious lines.

Panorama first visited the Lancashire town, made up of around 100,000 British white people and 40,000 British Asians, in 2007 to report on how the community was integrating. It returned 10 years later with a critical report of an increasing socially segregated area, described as a ‘national crisis’.

Read more: CRCW fights back against BBC Panorama’s negative portrayal of town