CRCW News and Events

“One of the privileges of being a CRCWM (Church Related Community Work Minister) is having time. Knowing that your post willinspire Levenshulme WebPhoto last at least 5 years, and may be even 10, gives a CRCWM an opportunity to develop strong working relationships and trust with local people, and to walk with them through journeys of transformation.”

In the second reflection for June, CRCWM Liz Kam talks about her work with an inspirational Women's group in Levenshulme: "...they are a flourishing group of women committed to breaking down barriers of difference, ethnicity, age, culture and religion".

Read more: Levenshulme Women's Group - A reflection by Liz Kam

‘Electronic Village Halls’ as described by the local council of Sunderland’s IT team are nowcomputer image Helen2 a really important resource for members of the community without access to a computer.

Redundant computers from the local council were made available to community projects and Helen Stephenson, CRCWm at the Sunderland and Boldon project, saw this as an opportune time to get involved: “With the knowledge at the time of the introduction of Universal Credit, which among other things would mean people seeking work and benefits would need access to a computer to fulfil what was required of them, and the closure of job centres and libraries where people could currently access IT, this presented us with an opportunity.”

Read how conversations with residents, and other local organisations at a consultation event lead to the CRCW project in Sunderland and Boldon developing their own Electronic Village Hall, which has grown from strength to strength:

Sunderland and Boldon's EVA.

This month, we have the first of our two CRCW reflections for May from community minister; Mal Breeze. Mal works for the North and East Blackburn CRCW project and 'The Open Door Memory Cafe' is one of the many community projects introduced to Blackburn. MemoryCafe Web

'It was very clear from the beginning that one church could not respond alone and that it had to be ecumenical if it was going to succeed and so there are four denominations involved, the Methodist Church, Anglican Church, Baptist Church and the URC.'

“The Open Door Memory Café was established in response to the needs of those living with memory loss in the community and the church. It is an ecumenical project, offering an informal, friendly and welcoming space where people with various forms of memory loss or dementia can come together for a cup of tea, chat and optional activities and homemade- cakes in proper China cups.”

You can read the full article here: How can the Church respond to those with memory loss in your community?

To read more about Mal Breeze in Blackburn, see our Projects page here.

According to Community Minister Pat Oliver, the variety of work within CRCW ministry is a bit like her favourite sweAllsortsets: Allsorts, because ‘they come in all shapes, sizes and colours, have different flavours which can clash or complement and they make the world feel better!’

Find out more about the church related work within Southampton’s community here: 'Community Allsorts'

You can read more about the CRCW project at Avenue St Andrews and Freemenatle in Southampton here.

Avenue St Andrews and Freemantle, Southampton

Alison HikingIn this reflection, we hear about Alison's time during her recent sabbatical and how important it was for her to go on her spiritual journey and to reflect upon the last 10 years of service.

Alison spent some of her time continuing the embroidery she had begun, as a memorial piece for the Building Bridges Project and says: ‘To achieve this I have read a lot, tried new techniques, which have included exploring my own creativity, spent time in special places and with my family.  This has been a  time to work differently,  to take stock, to learn, to be challenged and to refresh my own spirituality.’

To read Alison’s full reflection, click here.

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